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April 2020 Central Texas Housing Market Report

Austin-area home sales feel impact of COVID-19 pandemic

Signs of optimism remain

AUSTIN, Texas—Austin-area home sales declined across most of the region in April as the full impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and local shelter-in-place orders was felt in the housing market, according to the Austin Board of REALTORS® (ABoR) latest Central Texas Housing Market Report.

Compared to April 2019, residential sales in the five-county Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) decreased 21.6% to 2,611 sales, while sales dollar volume fell 18.3% to $1,060,228,668. A 7.3% decline in active listings to 6,349 listings drove housing inventory down further to 2.1 months, 0.2 months lower than this time last year. At the same time, median sales price increased 3.2% to $325,000 and homes spent nine fewer days on the market, or an average of 43 days.

“We anticipated a sharp decline in April home sales activity, as it directly correlates with the decline in listings activity recorded in March due to government stay-at-home orders,” ABoR President Romeo Manzanilla said. “Even with the impact to home sales, homes still spent less time on the market and sold at higher prices than last April. Austin’s housing demand is undeterred, and possibly strengthened by declining inventory.”

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Continued declines in listing activity in April 2020 could mean a second consecutive month of declining home sales. During the same period, active listings dropped 7.3% to 6,349 listings, new listings declined 21.1% to 3,516 listings, and pending sales declined 25% to 2,801 sales.

Lawrence Yun, chief economist and senior vice president of research at the National Association of REALTORS®, said while Central Texas has not been more negatively impacted than the U.S. housing market at large, he anticipates improvement in the market.

“As the economy steadily reopens, expect more listings to pop up, which will help ease the housing shortage. By the end of this year, home sales could be at levels comparable to 2019,” Yun said. “The local economy will also get an additional boost from more home construction that is needed for improving the market going into the next year,” Yun concluded.

Manzanilla is equally optimistic on the resiliency of Austin’s housing market. “It could have been much worse. Efforts to recognize real estate as an essential business helped lessen the negative impact of the pandemic during April; now listing and showing activity is already on the rise again. We’re hopeful this growth will continue in the coming weeks and months.”

City of Austin

In the city of Austin, the median price for residential homes experienced a double-digit increase of 12.3% year over year to $421,000. Residential sales decreased 33.1% to 759 sales, and sales dollar volume dropped by 23.9% to $387,921,787. During the same period, new listings decreased 24.8% to 1,158 listings, active listings fell 6.2% to 1,631 listings and pending sales declined 39% to 814 pending sales. Monthly housing inventory decreased 0.1 months year over year to 1.6 months of inventory.

Travis County

At the county level, residential sales declined 28.6% to 1,223 sales, and sales dollar volume dropped 23.7% to $602,124,601. The median price for residential homes increased 9.7% year over year to $395,000. During the same period, new listings decreased 26.5% to 1,779 listings, while active listings declined 12.8% to 2,929 listings. Pending sales also dropped 34.4% to 1,331 pending sales. Monthly housing inventory decreased 0.3 months year over year to 1.9 months of inventory.

Williamson County

In Williamson County, April residential sales decreased by 23.1% to 887 sales, and sales dollar volume declined 19.2% to $292,880,025. The median price showed resiliency and rose by 6.6% to $300,000. New listings declined 16.4% to 1,140 listings, while active listings slightly decreased 4.4% to 2,046 listings. Pending sales decreased 17.8% to 982 pending sales. Housing inventory declined 0.2 months year over year to 2.0 months of inventory.

Hays County

Despite the pandemic and stay-at-home orders, Hays County residential sales in April spiked 16.2% to 395 sales, and sales dollar volume jumped 18.6% to $136,147,504. The median price for residential homes declined by 1.6% to $284,950. During the same period, new listings increased 4.4% to 475 listings, and active listings increased 4% to 945 listings. Pending sales slightly decreased 1.9% to 368 pending sales. Housing inventory decreased 0.1 months to 2.8 months of inventory.

Bastrop County

In April, Bastrop County residential sales dropped 6.5% to 87 sales, while sales dollar volume marginally increased 3.1% to $24,229,255. The median price for residential homes increased 10.6% to $260,000. During the same period, new listings tumbled 41.7% to 98 listings, active listings slightly increased 0.9% to 339 listings and pending sales fell 9.3% to 98 pending sales. Housing inventory decreased 0.3 months to 3.6 months of inventory.

Caldwell County

In Caldwell County, April residential sales declined 36.7% to 19 sales, and sales dollar volume decreased by 45.2% to $4,095,899. The median home price slightly dropped 1.9% year over year to $202,500. During the same period, new listings fell by 51% to 24 listings, active listings decreased 10% to 90 listings and pending sales declined by 12% to 22 pending sales. Housing inventory decreased 0.5 months to 3.6 months of inventory. 

For more information, and to download the April 2020 Central Texas Housing Market Report, visit http://www.abor.com/statsapr20. All information taken from the Austin Board of Realtors March 2020 Central Texas Housing Market Report,

 

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Property Tax Protest FAQs

About this time of year, we get a lot of questions from clients, friends and family about property taxes, property tax protests and exemptions. We’ve put together some of the most frequently asked questions to help, but you can always reach out to your best TJ Lewis Real Estate agent to help!

How do I protest my property taxes?

There are different steps and stages to protesting your property taxes, but most start with filling an appeal online on your county’s appraisal distract website.

What am I protesting?

You are protesting your homes valuation, not the amount of your taxes or your tax rate. You cannot argue the tax rate – that is set by the different taxing entities (state, county, ISD, MUD, etc.) and is usually between 2-3%. The amount of your taxes is Your VALUATION (minus any exemptions) x Your Tax RATE. So if your valuation is $400,000 and your rate is 2% than your taxes for the year are $8000. What you are protesting the your valuation – the amount the county is saying your home is worth.

What property tax exemptions might be available to me?

The most common property tax exemptions are the exemptions for homestead, disability, senior citizen, agriculture and disable veteran. Here is a link to a video explaining a lot of details about exemptions.

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How do I know if I should protest my property taxes?

This is best determined by comparing the valuation from the county with the current home market. Your valuation is based on the a single date – January 1st of that year – and it is compared against the values for similar properties for the previous year. If you are using sold comparable sales data, you can only use properties that sold in the previous calendar year. For example, for protesting your taxes this year, you would compare it to sales in 2019. To determine the fair market value for your current property, contact a top TJ Lewis agent.

Can I protest my property taxes on my own?

 

Yes, you can but sometimes it is worth it to hire a professional to help you with the process. There are a number of local companies that specialize helping homeowners with protesting their taxes. Their fee is usually a percentage of the tax savings that they earn for their customers and they can also tell you if it is actually worth it to protest your taxes.

Why do my taxes go up?

Your taxes go up for two reasons. First, your taxes increase because your tax rate goes up. From time to time, counties increase taxes to pay for bonds and similar programs. School districts adjust their tax rates to track with their budgets. Many of these rates require local votes and others have caps from the state government. The second reason your taxes go up is that your home’s valuation has increased. Your taxes are based on home much your home is worth – when your home is worth more, you pay more in taxes.

How does a Homestead Exemption protect me?

A homestead exemption protects you in two ways – it exempts you from paying taxes on a percentage of your homes value thereby reducing your property taxes. The exemption also places a 10% cap on the increase a county can make on the valuation of your home each year.

How can I protest my property taxes?

 

There are three main types of property tax appeals – a market appeal, an equity appeal and an appeal based on characteristic correction. A market appeal is based on the believe that your homes valuation is not in line with the current market value of your home if you sold it (remember, you have to use the previous years data for this). An equity appeal is based on the values the county has assigned to similar properties or yours. If they have valued other homes similar to yours at a lower level, you can appeal based on this inequity. An appeal based on characteristics is made when the county has incorrect measurements or structures added to your home. If the square footage they have recorded for your home is higher than the actual square footage, you can argue for a reduced property tax valuation based on the incorrect data. Another example would be if their notes list a pool, shed or other structure in your backyard and have increased your value based on this when you do not actually have that structure, you can get an adjustment based on the county having these characteristics incorrect.

What is the difference between a online/E-File protest and an informal/formal hearing?

 

The online/e-file protests are done completely online and are a lower risk/lower reward system. They take less time as they are done online but any reductions in your value are usually less than what you might be able to get with the in-person informal/formal reviews. However, the online protest cannot result in an increased valuation, something that could happen through the other way. The informal/formal reviews require you to meet with different people at the appraisal board but can usually net you a higher reduction. They can result in an increased valuation if the board feels your value is actually too low. The tax protest professionals are especially good in these reviews.

These are a few Frequently Asked Questions about property tax protest and we hope this has been helpful for you! If you have specific questions about your home, your homes value or protesting your property taxes, contact your top TJ Lewis Real Estate agent and we would be honored to help!

 

 

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Should I Refinance?

One of the most common questions we are getting over the past few weeks is coming from homeowners who are wondering if now is the time for them to refinance their mortgage. Interest rates have been very low and in the new we have all seen the the Fed cut its benchmark to almost 0%! Does this mean that we can get a mortgage for 0%?! 

We would like to answer some of the most common questions about refinancing here, but if you have particular questions unique to your personal situation, reach out to your TJ Lewis Real Estate agent and he or she would be happy to help!

Does a 0% Fed rate mean I can get that interest rate for my mortgage?

Unfortunately, no, you cannot get a 0% mortgage interest rate. The Fed rate does have an impact on mortgage rates but there not directly related. A reduced Fed rate usually means you can get a lower interest rate but they will not be equal for a number of reasons we will not get into here – ask you real estate agent or lender.

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How do I know if I should try to refinance my mortgage?

There are a few situations that if you find yourself in right now, you should consider refinancing:

  • Your current mortgage interest rate is above 4%. You can likely get a new lower rate and it should be worth it for you to refinance. 
  • You have equity in your home and you are looking to “Cash Out.” A cash out refinance converts some of the equity you have in your home to cash in your bank account. Your mortgage balance will increase but the you might be able to keep the same payment because of the lower rates or by adjusting the length of your mortgage.
  • You have an adjustable rate mortgage. Adjustable rate mortgages can be great for short periods of time but are not ideal for the long term. Your rate could go up significantly and is unpredictable. Refinancing to a low, guaranteed rate could be a good idea. 
  • You need to consolidate debt. This is similar to the concept of a cash out refinance but you are using the cash to pay off other, higher interest debt. Maybe you have an car note or student loan that has a higher interest rate – you could refinance to consolidate that debt to a single, lower interest payment with your mortgage.

Ok, at least one of those answers describes my situation, what should I do next?

  • Contact your lender to get some basic questions answered. Do they have a program for me? How long does their refinance process work? What interest rate could be available to me?
  • Check your eligibility. Just because you own your home right now does not mean you automatically qualify to refinance right now. Contact your lender to check your eligibility. 
  • Get your document in ahead of time. The process to refinance can take 30-60 days so getting your documents in ahead of time could mean that your lender is ready to lock your rate as soon as it reaches the right rate. Rates fluctuate and your lender can be watching for the perfect time. If you wait until rates drop to the right level for you and then start the application process, you might miss out.

Are there any other benefits to refinancing?

When you close on your new mortgage, your next payment is not due until the second month. So if you close on June 15th, your first payment should not be due until August 1st – you’ve effectively skipped two payments!

If you have a question about refinance your home or need help finding the right lender, contact your TJ Lewis Real Estate agent and he or she will be happy to help!

 

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March 2020 Central Texas Housing Market Report

Austin area home sales hold steady in March

Central Texas REALTORS® remain cautiously optimistic during COVID-19 pandemic

AUSTIN, Texas – Local shelter-in-place orders that went into effect on March 24 had little impact on March home sales, according to the Austin Board of REALTORS® (ABoR) latest Central Texas Housing Market Report.

In March, residential sales in the five-county Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) increased 2.2% year over year to 3,042 sales and median price jumped 11.7% year over year to $335,200. Monthly housing inventory declined 0.7 months year over year to 1.6 months of inventory, and average days on market decreased from 65 days to 54 days.

“For most of March, it was still ‘business as usual,’ and REALTORS® adapted early to continue serving homebuyers and sellers safely,” Romeo Manzanilla, 2020 ABoR president, said. “Declines in listing activity and pending residential sales in March indicate that we won’t begin to see the true impact of COVID-19 on the housing market until our April report.”

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Last month, new listings decreased 12.7% to 3,770 listings; active listings dropped 26.6% to 4,908 listings; and pending sales decreased 19.2% to 2,852 pending sales.

Although COVID-19 has shifted the way real estate business is conducted, closings and home sales have not been negatively impacted thus far, Lea Holubec, senior vice president of education and training for Heritage Title of Austin, said.

“The approach to closing a home looks very different right now, but activity has not dipped,” Holubec said. “Homebuyers should be prepared for the closing process to take longer than usual due to COVID-19 safety precautions and be ready for additional employment verifications at closing, or even after closing, which many lenders are now requiring.”

“Like REALTORS®, sellers should remain cautiously optimistic during this time. Austin-area homebuyers are still looking to buy homes, and fewer homes on the market means stronger demand and increased visibility for your property,” Manzanilla said. “Despite the challenges of COVID-19, we’re still in a seller’s market and sellers should be encouraged to list their homes.”

City of Austin

In March, the median price for residential homes in the city of Austin rose 14% year over year to $415,000, an all-time high for any month on record. Residential home sales remained flat at 985 sales, while total sales dollar volume experienced a double-digit increase of 11.2% year over year to $503,132,316 last month. During the same period, new listings decreased 7.5% to 1,299 listings; active listings dropped 27.8% to 1,237 listings; and pending sales dipped 18.3% to 922 pending sales. Monthly housing inventory decreased 0.5 months year over year to 1.2 months of inventory.

Travis County

At the county level, residential home sales slightly increased 0.4% to 1,545 sales and sales dollar volume increased 11.8% to $783,614,704. The median price for residential homes jumped 15.1% year over year to $397,250. During the same period, new listings decreased 12.6% to 2,004 listings; active listings decreased 30.5% to 2,277 listings; and pending sales decreased 22.6% to 1,393 pending sales. Monthly housing inventory decreased 0.7 months year over year to 1.4 months of inventory.

Williamson County

In Williamson County, March residential home sales increased 0.4% to 1,007 sales and sales dollar volume increased 5.2% to $327,850,432. The median price for residential homes increased by 6.8% to $293,805. New listings declined 11% to 1,202 listings and active listings dropped 28.8% to 1,520 listings. Pending sales decreased 19.9% to 976 pending sales and housing inventory declined 0.8 months year over year to 1.5 months of inventory.

Hays County

In March, Hays County residential home sales increased 16.5% to 381 sales and sales dollar volume jumped 29% to $133,789,771. The median price for residential homes increased by 11.8% to $285,000. During the same period, new listings decreased 17.6% to 404 listings and active listings dropped 21.3% to 704 listings. Pending sales slightly decreased 6% to 359 pending sales. Housing inventory decreased 0.8 months to 2.1 months of inventory.

Bastrop County

In Bastrop County, residential home sales remained flat at 77 home sales, while sales dollar volume increased 13.7% to $20,306,295. The median price for residential homes slightly increased 3.7% to $239,950. During the same period, new listings spiked 27.8% to 124 listings; active listings rose 16.1% to 324 listings; and pending sales jumped 20.7% to 105 pending sales. Housing inventory decreased 0.1 months to 3.3 months of inventory.

Caldwell County

In Caldwell County, March residential home sales remained flat at 29 sales, while sales dollar volume spiked 33.8% to $8,153,889. The median home price increased 18.7% year over year to $237,450. During the same period, new listings decreased 23.3% to 33 listings, while active listings increased 15.6% to 89 listings. Pending sales dropped 21.9% to 25 pending sales. Housing inventory rose 0.1 months to 3.4 months of inventory.

For more information, and to download the March 2020 Central Texas Housing Market Report, visit https://www.abor.com/statsmar20/. All information taken from the Austin Board of Realtors March 2020 Central Texas Housing Market Report,

 

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February 2020 Central Texas Housing Market Report

February housing sales strong, REALTORS® adapt amid COVID-19

Historically low interest rates add another variable to housing market

AUSTIN, Texas – The Austin Board of REALTORS® (ABoR) February 2020 market analysis showed a 6.8% increase in residential home sales in the Austin-Round Rock Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) and a 12.8% increase in median sales price to $327,140. While sales increased from 2,363 homes in February 2019 to 2,524 homes last month, new listings decreased 11.8% year-over-year, and inventory dropped to 1.5 months of inventory, painting the picture of Austin’s historically competitive housing market and high demand. With the impact of COVID-19 beginning to take hold, it’s uncertain how social distancing will affect the way the market continues to operate.

“Historically low interest rates are a driver in the market response we saw in February and will continue to act as a driver despite our shared concerns over the impact of COVID-19 in our community,” Romeo Manzanilla, 2020 ABoR president, said.

Manzanilla said there are a number of tools and best practices that ensure REALTORS® can continue to serve Central Texas home buyers and sellers safely as we all make changes to accommodate the Center for Disease Control’s guidelines.

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“REALTORS® will work to provide a new homebuying and selling experience in these times. Expanded visual libraries, interactive floor plans and virtual tours are tools that matter more than ever in this climate. The housing market is absolutely still open for business, but the business of real estate is evolving like we all are through this experience,” Manzanilla concluded.

Austin’s economy and housing market could be well positioned to minimize the potentially negative impact of COVID-19, Mark Sprague, state director of information capital for Independence Title, said.

“Austin’s economy has diversified and strengthened over the past two decades. This leads me to be optimistic that our region is in a strong position to withstand economic downturns that may have a greater impact nationally,” Sprague said. “Effects will still be felt, especially by those who depend on each paycheck to pay their bills and provide for their families, and that cannot be discounted.”

According to Sprague, despite the current uncertainty, buyers are still eager to close sales in Austin.

 

“Current indicators are that Austin’s housing market remains strong and competitive. Any decrease in inventory would only increase competitiveness in our market. Overall, Austin’s economy and housing market look to be resilient during this uncertain time. Once COVID-19 subsides, there is a potential for even more investment by employers in the Austin market, and I would expect those looking for a more affordable cost of living compared to other major U.S. metropolitan areas will still look to move to and buy homes in Austin,” he concluded.

Austin-Round Rock MSA

In the Austin-Round Rock MSA, the median sales price for February 2020 was $327,140, an increase of 12.8% from February 2019. February residential home sales dollar volume increased 21% to $1,027,245,686. During the same period, new listings decreased 11.8% to 2,925 listings, and active listings decreased 29.4% to 4,534 listings. However, pending sales jumped 10.9% to 3,137 pending sales. Monthly housing inventory declined 0.7 months year over year to 1.5 months of inventory. Across the five-county MSA there were 2,524 closed sales.

 

City of Austin

High demand across the city and limited inventory pushed the median price for residential homes to $395,000, a 14% increase from February 2019. Residential home sales increased 3.3% to 857 sales and total sales dollar volume increased by 18.1% year over year to $417,071,623 last month. During the same period, new listings decreased 5.6% to 1,032 listings; active listings dropped 34% to 1,072 listings; however, pending sales rose 4.5% to 999 pending sales. Monthly housing inventory decreased 0.6 months year over year to 1.0 month of inventory.

Travis County

At the county level, residential home sales increased 8.8% to 1,301 sales and sales dollar volume increased by 22% to $613,634,673. The median price for residential homes increased 13.2% year over year to $376,500. During the same period, new listings decreased 13.6% to 1,550 listings, while active listings decreased 35% to 2,022 listings. However, pending sales increased 9.4% to 1,615 pending sales. Monthly housing inventory decreased 0.7 months year over year to 1.3 months of inventory.

 

Williamson County

In Williamson County, February residential home sales increased 4.7% to 851 sales; sales dollar volume experienced a double-digit increase of 13.3% to $277,257,487. The median price for residential homes increased by 6.8% to $293,600. New listings declined 16.9% to 863 listings, while active listings decreased 33.7% to 1,398 listings. Pending sales increased 7.1% to 991 pending sales and housing inventory declined 0.9 months year over year to 1.4 months of inventory.

Hays County

In February, Hays County residential home sales increased 3.9% to 270 sales and sales dollar volume jumped 37.6% to $110,763,712. The median price for residential homes increased by 9.6% to $285,000. During the same period, new listings decreased 4.4% to 351 listings and active listings dropped 17.6% to 700 listings. Pending sales spiked 23.7% to 397 pending sales. Housing inventory decreased 0.7 months to 2.1 months of inventory.

Bastrop County

 

In Bastrop County, residential home sales remained flat at 77 home sales, while sales dollar volume increased 13.7% to $20,306,295. The median price for residential homes slightly increased 3.7% to $239,950. During the same period, new listings spiked 27.8% to 124 listings; active listings rose 16.1% to 324 listings; and pending sales jumped 20.7% to 105 pending sales. Housing inventory decreased 0.1 months to 3.3 months of inventory.

Caldwell County

In Caldwell County, February residential home sales spiked 47.1% to 25 sales, and sales dollar volume jumped 40.4% to $5,379,315. The median home price decreased 9.6% year over year to $201,000. During the same period, new listings spiked 85% to 37 listings; active listings increased 18.4% to 90 listings; and pending sales rose by 38.1% to 29 pending sales. Housing inventory rose 0.3 months to 3.5 months of inventory.

For more information, and to download the February 2020 Central Texas Housing Market Report, visit www.abor.com/statsfeb2020.

The Austin Board of REALTORS® (ABoR) is a nonprofit organization that has been serving the needs of Austin REALTORS® and consumers for more than 90 years. ABoR provides technology, education, and advocacy for more than 13,000 members, as well as monthly housing market reports for Travis, Hays, Williamson, Bastrop, and Caldwell counties. ABoR’s market reports include the most accurate multiple listing service (MLS) findings for the Austin area.

For more information, and to download the January 2020 Central Texas Housing Market Report, visit www.abor.com/statsjan2020. All information taken from the Austin Board of Realtors December & Year-End 2019 Central Texas Housing Market Report,

 

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January 2020 Central Texas Housing Market Report

Steady gains in January home sales signal strong year ahead for Austin area

Housing inventory continues to decline

The first Central Texas Housing Market Report of the year shows steady gains in both home sales and prices across the five-county Austin-Round Rock Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), according to the Austin Board of REALTORS® (ABoR).

Compared to January 2019, residential home sales in the Austin area increased 8.5% to 1,947 sales, and the median price increased 4.8% to $308,000, setting a record for the month of January. Housing inventory––which fell to 1.6 months––was driven to critically low levels across the MSA due to drops in both new and active listings. At the same time, increases in pending sales activity in January could signal further declines in inventory in the year ahead amidst strong housing demand.

“While this January showed significant gains compared to January 2019, the beginning of the year is a traditionally slower time for new and active listings,” Romeo Manzanilla, 2020 ABoR president, said. “We expect to see a significant increase in activity in the spring when market activity should climb naturally.”

The January 2020 Central Texas Housing Market Report also marks a transition to reporting on all residential properties (single-family homes, condos, and townhomes), rather than previous reports reflecting only single-family homes.

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“Austin’s competitive housing market is changing the landscape of traditional homeownership. We’re seeing more homebuyers purchase condos and townhomes in an effort to live closer to the urban core or stay within their budget,” Manzanilla added. “Focusing only on single-family housing leaves out half of the story, especially in the city of Austin where multi-family housing options are not only desired but greatly needed.”

Lawrence Yun, chief economist and senior vice president of research at the National Association of REALTORS®, commented on the Austin area’s continued growth.

“Austin’s engine of job and population growth is not projected to slow down anytime soon,” Yun said. “Looking at other metro areas across the U.S. that have faced similar circumstances, this level of rapid, positive growth will not be sustainable without a continued influx of a variety of housing types and careful transportation planning.”

Manzanilla concluded: “The discussion in Austin at the local level has been around addressing these very issues––diversifying our housing stock so families of all different backgrounds and income levels can afford a place of their own in Austin.”

Austin-Round Rock MSA

In the Austin-Round Rock MSA, residential home sales in January rose 8.5% to 1,947 home sales, with a 9.6% sales dollar volume increase to $726,157,216. During the same period, new listings decreased 14.3% to 2,723 listings, and active listings decreased 24.1% to 4,889 listings. However, pending sales jumped 13.1% to 2,956 pending sales. Monthly housing inventory declined 0.6 months year over year to 1.6 months of inventory.

City of Austin

In the city of Austin, the median price for residential homes experienced a double-digit percent increase of 13.5% year over year to $384,750. Residential home sales increased 0.6% to 638 sales and sales dollar volume increased by 8.2% to $290,628,094. During the same period, new listings decreased 10.6% to 960 listings; active listings dropped 32.5% to 1,099 listings; however, pending sales rose 8.6% to 956 pending sales. Monthly housing inventory decreased 0.5 months year over year to 1.1 months of inventory.

 

Travis County

At the county level, residential home sales slightly increased 2.9% to 1,001 sales and sales dollar volume increased by 3.5% to $431,960,522. The median price for residential homes increased 7.8% year over year to $351,000. During the same period, new listings decreased 14.4% to 1,435 listings, while active listings decreased 28.8% to 2,178 listings. However, pending sales increased 9.1% to 1,481 pending sales. Monthly housing inventory decreased 0.6 months year over year to 1.4 months of inventory.

Williamson County

In Williamson County, January residential home sales increased 11.6% to 654 sales; sales dollar volume had a double-digit percent jump of 15.3% to $202,314,400. The median price for residential homes slightly increased 2% to $279,990. New listings declined 15.1% to 838 listings, while active listings decreased 27.1% to 1,557 listings. Pending sales increased 11.4% to 990 pending sales. Housing inventory declined 0.8 months year over year to 1.5 months of inventory.

Hays County

 

In January, Hays County residential home sales spiked 22.8% to 205 sales and sales dollar volume jumped 22.2% to $67,627,774. The median price for residential homes declined by 2.6% to $255,000. During the same period, new listings dropped 19% to 298 listings, while active listings decreased 15% to 745 listings. Pending sales spiked 29.2% to 354 pending sales. Housing inventory decreased 0.6 months to 2.3 months of inventory.

Bastrop County

In January, Bastrop County residential home sales increased 22.2% to 66 home sales and sales dollar volume sharply increased 42.2% to $18,081,527. The median price for residential homes increased 12.6% to $241,000. During the same period, new listings increased 3.6% to 116 listings; active listings rose 8.6% to 317 listings; and pending sales spiked 28.8% to 94 pending sales. Housing inventory decreased 0.1 months to 3.4 months of inventory.

Caldwell County

In Caldwell County, January residential home sales spiked 50% to 21 sales and sales dollar volume skyrocketed 188.8% to $5,924,220. The median home

 

price sharply increased 62.1% year over year to $232,807. During the same period, new listings increased 9.1% to 36 listings; active listings increased 15% to 92 listings; and pending sales rose by 94.7% to 37 pending sales. Housing inventory rose 0.3 months to 3.7 months of inventory.

For more information, and to download the January 2020 Central Texas Housing Market Report, visit www.abor.com/statsjan2020. All information taken from the Austin Board of Realtors December & Year-End 2019 Central Texas Housing Market Report,

 

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December & Year-End 2019 Central Texas Housing Market Report

Austin area closes decade with record-breaking $13B in home sales

Single-family home sales increased by 84% since 2010

AUSTIN, TX – While Austin continued to rank high on “Best of U.S.” lists, Central Texas REALTORS® sold more homes in 2019 than any year on record, according to the latest Austin Board of REALTORS® (ABoR) analysis. The December and Year-End 2019 Central Texas Housing Market Report reflects a record-breaking 33,084 home sales and $13,158,737,333 in sales volume.

“Austin’s unprecedented population growth during the past decade has heavily impacted the real estate market. Compared to 2010, home sales in 2019 increased by 84%,” Romeo Manzanilla, 2020 ABoR president said. “That type of exponential growth has put enormous pressure on the market, raising the median home price from $193,520 in 2010 to $318,000 in 2019. As we look forward to this year, the market is not showing signs of slowing down anytime soon.”

Austin is one of only eight U.S. metro areas to have fully recovered in the last 10 years to prerecession values, Mark Sprague, state director of information capital at Independence Title, said.

“Austin’s GDP, which grew 117% over the last 20 years, helped the real estate market recover from the recession,” he said. “The closest metro out of the top 50 in the U.S. to see this type of growth was Silicon Valley, which grew its GDP by 99% during the same period.”

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Austin-Round Rock MSA

In the Austin-Round Rock MSA—now the 30th largest U.S. metropolitan area—the median price for single-family homes increased by 2.6% to $318,000 in 2019. During the same period, sales increased by 7.2% to 33,084 sales. New listings for the five-county MSA increased year over year by 1.4% to 39,309 listings in 2019. Active listings decreased 4.3% to 6,216 listings, but pending sales increased 10.5% to 33,976 pending sales.

Sprague said every real estate channel in the Austin metro—from homes to warehouses—is doing well, even though not enough inventory is available.

In December 2019, sales volume in the Greater Austin area increased by 9.2% to 2,608 sales, while inventory decreased by 0.5 months to 1.7 months of inventory. Growing demand pushed the median price of a single-family home to $323,000, a 7.1% increase from December 2018.

“If we don’t take action to increase housing supply in Austin, we will continue to see exponential increases in home values,” said Manzanilla. “ABoR continues to advocate for an updated land development code in Austin for exactly this reason—so that folks who want to purchase a home in the area can afford to do so.”

City of Austin

In 2019, Austin’s median home price increased by 5.3% to $395,000 compared to the previous year. During the same period, sales rose by 1.8% to 9,572 homes and sales dollar volume grew 6.9% to $4,678,400,967. In December, the median home price increased 8% year over year to $405,093 and sales increased 8.9% year over year to 738 home sales. Austin’s monthly housing inventory decreased in December from 0.5 months to 0.9 months of inventory.

Travis County

 

In Travis County, the median price for single-family homes grew by 3.6% to $372,000 for 2019 vs. 2018 and sales grew similarly—4.7% to 16,042 sales. The December median home price rose 6.3% year over year to $369,000 and sales increased 8.8% year over year to 1,257 sales. The monthly housing inventory for December dropped by 0.5 months to 1.4 months of inventory.

Williamson County

 

While Williamson County’s median home price increased in 2019 to $287,774, it remains significantly lower than the median in both Travis County and the city of Austin. Single-family home sales in Williamson County increased by 10.5% to 11,797 sales in 2019 compared to 2018. In December, the median home price rose 4.3% year over year to $290,280; sales increased 14.1% to 970 sales. Housing inventory declined 0.5 months year over year to 1.8 months of inventory.

Hays County

In Hays County, the median home price increased by 1.8% to $268,000 in 2019. Sales increased by 6.9% to 3,829 sales. The median home price in December grew 1.5% year over year to $269,000; December sales increased 2.2% to 279 sales. Housing inventory decreased 0.2 months to 2.6 months of inventory.

 

Bastrop County

In 2019, Bastrop County’s median home price increased by 5% to $239,450 in 2019 and sales increased by 12.2% to 1,120 sales. In December, the median home price grew by 2% to $234,500, but sales dropped 3.4% to 86 sales. December’s monthly housing inventory increased by 0.1 months to 3.3 months of inventory.

Caldwell County

Caldwell County’s median home price increased by 11.1% to $199,900 in 2019 and sales increased by 3.9% to 296 sales. In December, the median home price rose 17.1% to $205,000, but sales dropped 23.8% to 16 sales. Monthly housing inventory grew by 0.5 months in December to 3.8 months of inventory.

For more information and to download the December and Year-End 2019 Central Texas Housing Market Report, visit www.abor.com/statsdec19. All information taken from the Austin Board of Realtors December & Year-End 2019 Central Texas Housing Market Report,